“Morning Song of Senlin” by Conrad Aiken

“Few poets can have made greater efforts or faced more reasonably deprivation of recognition. [Aiken's] truly prodigious output met with curiously intermittent appreciation, periods of long neglect being taken with unflagging endurance and resolution. Along with this went a truly noteworthy immunity to those infections of jealousy and envy which afflict so many of us.” – I. A. Richards

Full Story

“The Snowman” by Eric Thomas Norris

Eric Norris is the author of 3 books: Terence, Nocturnal Omissions—with Gavin Geoffrey Dillard, and Cock Sucking (On Mars). He is a founding editor of the online poetry journal Kin (wearekin.org). Eric is also a co-host of the Carmine Street Metrics reading series at The Bowery Poetry Club in New York City.

Full Story

Hair. Not the Musical. Your Hair. And Some Facts You Ought to Know, Such As . . .

“In Renaissance Venice, women dyed their hair blonde using horse urine.”

Full Story

“Coda” by Basil Bunting

Though his major poems were not written until late in life, and despite the sporadic composition of his poetry, Basil Bunting wrote some of the most enduring verse of the twentieth century. Born in Northumberland, England, and raised in Quaker boarding schools, Bunting lived all over the world, working for Ford Madox Ford in Paris, for the British Government in Persia, and as a professor in California. Through his literary connections, he became an associate and disciple of Ezra Pound, who greatly influenced Bunting’s poetry. Believing that sound is the only indispensable facet of poetry, Bunting evokes his Northumberland dialect in short, strong lines, which are often allusive and dense.

Full Story

“I Can Picture Hilbert in a Drunken Brawl with Christopher Marlowe. I Mean this as a Compliment”: All of You on the Good Earth Reviewed in The New Criterion

The April poetry issue of The New Criterion is now available: Bruce Bawer discusses Marianne Moore’s life and art, William Logan considers Emily Dickinson’s envelope poems, and David Yezzi addresses the musicality of Robert Frost, the latest in his stunning series of essays on modern poetry. The issue also contains a magnificent new poem by Christian Wiman and a review of Ernest Hilbert’s latest collection All of You on the Good Earth.

Full Story

If You Text While You Drive, Stop. Just Stop It. Now. Werner Herzog Agrees.

“There’s a completely new culture out there. I’m not a participant of texting and driving—or texting at all—but I see there’s something going on in civilization which is coming with great vehemence at us.” – Werner Herzog

Full Story

“The Novelist” by W.H. Auden

They can amaze us like a thunderstorm . . .

Full Story

“JUNKYARD” a Short Animated Film by Hisko Hulsing

“A man is robbed and stabbed on a metro train. As he lays dying, a friendship from his youth flashes before his eyes.”

Full Story

“Dinner and a Movie” a Short Film by Ben Aston

“A heartwarming dramady about love, life and prison dating websites… Lovestruck Randy is thrilled when his prison pen pal Crystal is finally released and they can meet in person, but is woefully unprepared for the hard truths (among other things) she brings along with her to their date.”

Full Story

“Almanac” by Kelly Grovier

Kelly Grovier is the founder of the scholarly journal European Romantic Review and a regular contributor to the Observer and the Times Literary Supplement. He is a lecturer in English and Creative Writing at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, and the author of the poetry collection A Lens in the Palm.

Full Story

“The Awareness . . .”

“On the eve of a technological breakthrough, an insignificant janitor and a prominent engineer are faced with a decision that will alter the course of humanity: the release of the first aware computer system into the world.”

Full Story

From Joachim Du Bellay’s Les Antiquitez de Rome

Karl Kirchwey is the author of six books of poems, A Wandering Island (Princeton University Press, 1990; recipient of the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America), Those I Guard (Harcourt Brace and Company, 1993), The Engrafted Word (Henry Holt, 1998; a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year”), At the Palace of Jove (Putnam, 2002), The Happiness of This World: Poetry and Prose (2007), and Mount Lebanon (Marian Wood Books/Putnam, 2011). Poems Under Saturn, his translation of Paul Verlaine’s Poemes saturniens, was published by Princeton University Press in 2011.

Full Story

“When the Zombies Come” a Short Film by Jon Hurst

Official Selection of Atlanta Film Festival, Friars Club Film Festival, Florida Film Festival, Martha’s Vineyard Film Festival, BAMcinemaFest, Rooftop Films Summer Series, Independent Film festival Boston, Stanely Film Festival, Philidephia Film Festival, Crested Butte Film Festival. And now your computer.

Full Story

Books are Dead, Blah Blah Blah, Yeah, Yeah, Now Hold On Just One Minute and Look at This

Thanks to Andrew for sending this one in.

Full Story

Do You Like it When Cats Purr? You Should, It Might Just Save Your Life: This Handy Chart Explains

So next time a cat gets on your lap and purrs, don’t push it off!

Full Story

“Support” by Leonard Gontarek

Philadelphia poet Leonard Gontarek’s poetry collections include Déjà Vu Diner (2006) and St. Genevieve Watching Over Paris (1984). His poems have also been featured in Joyful Noise: An Anthology of American Spiritual Poetry (2006) and in Best American Poetry (2005). He uses juxtaposition to explore themes of transformation and transcendence and has described his poems as “equal parts political, erotic, and meditations on the world.” In an interview with G.E. Reutter, Gontarek continued, “My views on these things are complicated; hence the overlay texture of the poems.” Reviewing Déjà Vu Diner, Amy Small-McKinney observed that “Leonard Gontarek asks his readers to hear, see, and practically touch, as though in a state of synesthesia, the particulars of his world. His poems ask us to suspend our own worldviews, to trust him, and to give ourselves over to his meticulous use of language and startling juxtapositions of imagery.”

Gontarek’s honors include several Pushcart Prize nominations and two fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. He has edited several anthologies of children’s poetry, including This Is Forever the Room (1979), The Balloonists Are Coming Back from the Clouds (1978), and Rain of the Haunted Trees (1979). He coordinates Peace/Works: Poets and Writers for Peace and has taught through the Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership and the Arts League in Philadelphia. He lives in Philadelphia.

Full Story

“Puma” by Ted Hughes

“What’s writing really about? It’s about trying to take fuller possession of the reality of your life.” – Ted Hughes

Full Story

Camera Falls from Airplane and Lands in Pig Pen

Have a great weekend everyone!

Full Story

“Our Drone Future” a Short Film from Alex Cornell

“Our Drone Future explores the technology, capability, and purpose of drones, as their presence becomes an increasingly pervasive reality in the skies of tomorrow. In the near future, cities use semi-autonomous drones for urban security. Human officers monitor drone feeds remotely, and data reports are displayed with a detailed HUD and communicated via a simulated human voice (designed to mitigate discomfort with sentient drone technology). While the drones operate independently, they are “guided” by the human monitors, who can suggest alternate mission plans and ask questions. Specializing in predictive analysis, the security drones can retask themselves to investigate potential threats. As shown in this video, an urban security drone surveys San Francisco’s landmarks and encounters fierce civilian resistance.”

Full Story

Get Ready to Scroll Through a Scale Model of the Solar System

Click on the box below to visit the site and take off through our solar system. Fun!

Full Story

“LOT254″ a Short Horror Film by Toby Meakins

“A Collector repairs a vintage cine camera unlocking the hidden terror of LOT254.”

Full Story

E-Verse Equinox Returns to Ring in the Spring with Poets Sarah Arvio, Jenn McCreary, and Harry Robert Stoneback

Sarah Arvio, author of Night Thoughts (2013), with Jenn McCreary, author of & Now My Feet Are Maps (2013), and H.R. Stoneback, author of Hurricane Hymn (2009), hosted by Ernest Hilbert. Open microphone session hosted by Paul Siegell to follow featured readers

Full Story

Scared of Heights? These Guys Aren’t

Get your vertigo on.

Full Story

“Boccherini In the Afternoon” by Mark Schorr

Mark Schorr’s books include “Conscious Explanations” (Pen & Anvil); “Heart’s Ladder”, a collection of forty sonnets; the book-length renga sequence “Recovery: 77 Dream Songs”; “One On A Side: An Evening with Seamus Heaney & Robert Frost” (as editor, with Kevin O’Connor); and “Poetry to the Max: A Shop Manual.” His writing has appeared in periodicals including Poetry Northeast and Fulcrum. He currently serves as the Executive Director of the Robert Frost Foundation in Lawrence, Massacusetts; and has been teaching at Cambridge College in Lawrence since 2004.

Full Story

Five Poems from the “Haunted Forest” Sequence by Jenn McCreary

Jenn McCreary’s new full-length collection, & now my feet are maps, is now available from Dusie Press. Other works include The Dark Mouth of Living (Horse Less Press), :ab ovo: (Dusie Press), a doctrine of signatures (Singing Horse Press), & Odyssey & Oracle (Least Weasel Press). worrywort, a collaboration with Pattie McCarthy, will be published by Little Red Leaves Textile Editions in 2014. She lives in Philadelphia with her family, where she co-edits ixnay press with Chris McCreary & was recently named a 2013 Pew Fellow in the Arts for poetry.

Full Story

Imagine if Lions Jumped on You the Way Your Housecats Do

Kevin Richardson, lion conservation expert, plays with some lions as if they’re house cats. It’s partly frightening, partly endearing; scary and cute in equal measures. It’s presented as part of an ad campaign for GoPro cameras, but it’s well worth a look.

Full Story

“Outside Death Spiral: On Watching the Favorite TV Programs of a Lost Loved One” by H.R. Stoneback

H. R. Stoneback (BA Rutgers-Camden 1965; PhD Vanderbilt 1970) is Distinguished Professor of English at the State University of New York (New Paltz). He has also been a Visiting Professor at the University of Paris, a Senior Fulbright Professor at Peking University (Beijing, China) and the Saint-John Perse Fellow of the French-American Foundation in Aix-en-Provence. An internationally renowned poet and literary critic, he is the author of more than 200 essays on such authors as Lawrence Durrell, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Robert Penn Warren and numerous other poets and writers. He has published (as author or editor) more than 30 books, roughly half literary criticism, and half books of his poetry. His book, Reading Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, the inaugural volume in the Kent State University Press Reading Hemingway Series—nominated for several prestigious awards (the Brooks-Warren Award, the SAMLA critical studies award, etc.)—is widely used in university courses and placed on the short list of recommended critical studies for the national Agrégation Examination in France. His award-winning poetry has been published in scores of journals in the U.S. and abroad. Recent volumes of poetry include Why Athletes Prefer Cheerleaders & Other Poems, Voices of Women Singing and Amazing-Grace-Wheelchair-Jumpshot-Jesus-Love-Poems. Forthcoming books include three volumes of poetry, The Stones of Strasbourg, My Boardwalk Empire, and a cycle of Pennsylvania Poems; forthcoming critical volumes include Hemingway’s Provence: Our Provence? (a meditation on the Spirit of Place and Hemingway’s symbolic landscapes), Passions, Places, Pilgrimages: Selected Essays on Hemingway 1976-2013 and Composition of Place: Selected Essays on Elizabeth Madox Roberts; other works-in-progress include The Stoney & Sparrow Songbook; Volume One ( a collection of his songs with commentary) and volumes of memoir and fiction. He currently serves as an officer of several literary organizations in the U.S. and France; in 2013-2014 he is Vice-President (President in 2015) of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, a national/international organization of more than 2,000 writers and scholars. He has been the organizer and director of more than 35 literary conferences in the U.S. and abroad. Among his numerous honors and awards, he cites only his 2013 gubernatorial commission as a Kentucky Colonel—and wonders what benefits (such as certain legendary products of Kentucky) accompany his colonel’s commission.

Full Story

Top Five things to Watch Because You Miss Breaking Bad

Breaking Bad has been off the air for several months now, and a lot of people still haven’t found a way to fill that void left by the departure of their favorite meth cooker. There’s nothing out there like Breaking Bad anymore, but here are a few suggestions anyway, to help you get through.

Full Story

“The Swan at Edgewater Park” by Ruth L. Schwartz

“Ruth L. Schwartz’s poems are passionate and compassionate engagements with the sensuous richness that is this living world. Her empathy reaches broadly into every terrain and being, enlarging our understanding of the body’s hunger not for continuance only, but for connection. There is not a poem in this book that could not be called a love poem.” – Jane Hirshfield

Full Story