“The Swan at Edgewater Park” by Ruth L. Schwartz

“Ruth L. Schwartz’s poems are passionate and compassionate engagements with the sensuous richness that is this living world. Her empathy reaches broadly into every terrain and being, enlarging our understanding of the body’s hunger not for continuance only, but for connection. There is not a poem in this book that could not be called a love poem.” – Jane Hirshfield

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“The Early Ones” by William Stafford

“William Stafford’s quiet presence in the landscape of American poetry in my lifetime has been a kind of continuing reassurance.” —W. S. Merwin

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It’s Friday, So Here’s a Local Philly Cat Playing Piano with a Full Orchestra

Because you need to see this too. And you’re welcome.

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“Gravelly Run” by A.R. Ammons

[T]he most distinguished book of American verse, in my judgment, since the publication of Wallace Stevens’s Collected Poems. – Harold Bloom on Ammons’ collected poems.

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Anna Calvi Absolutely Kills Us with Three Songs on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert

Three songs from her self-titled debut, “River To The Sea,” “Surrender,” and “Jezebel.”

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“Godzilla Agonistes” by Christopher Bullard

Chris Bullard is a native of Jacksonville, FL. He lives in Collingswood, NJ, and works for the federal government as an Administrative Law Judge. He received his BA from the University of Pennsylvania and his MFA from Wilkes University. Plan B Press published his chapbook, You Must Not Know Too Much, in 2009. Big Table Publishing published his second chapbook, O Brilliant Kids, in 2011. WordTech Editions published his first full-length book of poetry, Back, in November of 2013. Kattywompus Press published his third chapbook, Dear Leatherface, in January of 2014.

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Concert Poster for the New Opera The Red Silk Thread: An Epic Tale of Marco Polo by Stella Sung with Libretto by Ernest Hilbert

The production team just sent the official poster for the new opera The Red Silk Thread: An Epic Tale of Marco Polo by Stella Sung.

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“The Peacock at Alderton” by Geoffrey Hill

Geoffrey Hill, the son of a police constable, was born in Worcestershire in 1932. He was educated at Bromsgrove County High School and at Keble College, Oxford. After teaching for more than thirty years in England, first at Leeds and subsequently at Cambridge, he became Professor of Literature and Religion at Boston University in Massachusetts, where he was also founding co-director of the Editorial Institute. In 2010 he was elected Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford.

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“Song” by Ted Hughes

“What happens in the heart, simply happens.” – Ted Hughes

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“Sex Goddess of the Western Hemisphere” by Maggie Estep on MTV’s Unplugged

Maggie Estep “passed away of complications February 12, 2014, after suffering cardiac arrest February 9th, 2014.”

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“I Took Some Weapons” by Andrew Goodspeed

Andrew Goodspeed was born in New York City. He was educated at the University of Michigan, Oxford, and Trinity College, Dublin. He is currently the Provost of South East European University, Tetovo, Macedonia.

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“I’m Not Neurasthenic About the Lights”: An Evening of Poetry with Robert Lowell: Classic Black and White Television Broadcast

“Robert Lowell was one of the three or four greatest American poets of the twentieth century . . . his real peers are the classics of American literature: Melville and Whitman, Eliot and Frost . . . Lowell’s torrential eloquence, his historical consciousness, his moral and political seriousness are a standing challenge.” – Adam Kirsch, The Times Literary Supplement

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“Ice” by Robert Lowell

“angrily we skate on blacker ice . . .”

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“The Deserted Village” by Oliver Goldsmith

“Reading Oliver Goldsmith’s poem of 1770, The Deserted Village, today is dizzying. Goldsmith paints a picture of ruin resulting from the accumulation of wealth in a few hands: desolation and dispossession or the poor, while the rich man luxuriates in ‘a space that many poor supplied; / Space for his lake, his park’s extended bounds, / Space for his horses, equipage and hounds.’” – Norma Clarke

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“Daylilies” by Teresa Leo

Teresa Leo is the author of two books of poetry, Bloom in Reverse (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014) and The Halo Rule (Elixir Press, 2008), winner of the Elixir Press Editors’ Prize. Her work has appeared in the American Poetry Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, Women’s Review of Books, New Orleans Review, Barrow Street, The Florida Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, and elsewhere. Her awards include a Pew fellowship, a Leeway Foundation grant, two Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowships, and the Richard Peterson Poetry Prize from Crab Orchard Review. She works at the University of Pennsylvania.

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“X” by Christine Yurick

Christine Yurick’s poems have appeared in Barbaric Yawp, Schuylkill Valley Journal, Autumn Sky, and are forthcoming in American Arts Quarterly and Angle. She is the founding editor of Think Journal and is currently working on a biographical sketch of Anne Stevenson.

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Jack Kerouac Reads from On the Road on The Steve Allen Show in 1959

“So in America when the sun goes down and I sit on the old broken-down river pier watching the long, long skies over New Jersey and sense all that raw land that rolls in one unbelievable huge bulge over to the West Coast, and all that road going, and all the people dreaming in the immensity of it, and in Iowa I know by now the children must be crying in the land where they let the children cry, and tonight the stars’ll be out, and don’t you know that God is Pooh Bear? the evening star must be drooping and shedding her sparkler dims on the prairie, which is just before the coming of complete night that blesses the earth, darkens all the rivers, cups the peaks and folds the final shore in, and nobody, nobody knows what’s going to happen to anybody besides the forlorn rags of growing old, I think of Dean Moriarty, I even think of Old Dean Moriarty the father we never found, I think of Dean Moriarty.”

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“Looking Back in My Eighty-First Year” by Maxine Kumin

“Kumin always circles back to the giving land, the clasp of family, and her bedrock belief in the power of art.” -Donna Seaman

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“Actors” by Terese Coe

Terese Coe’s poems and translations have appeared in The Threepenny Review, Poetry Review, The TLS, The Cincinnati Review, New American Writing, Poetry, Ploughshares, Agenda, Tar River Poetry, Smartish Pace, New Walk Magazine, Alaska Quarterly Review, The Stinging Fly, The Huffington Post, and many other journals, anthologies, and ezines. Her book of poems is The Everyday Uncommon. Copies of her poem “More” were heli-dropped over London as part of the 2012 London Olympics’ Poetry Parnassus and Rain of Poems.

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“At the Fish Market” by Zachary Bos

Boston poet and critic Zachary Bos has appeared in Basilica Review, Bellevue Literary Review, Black Herald, Free Verse, Fulcrum, Literary Imagination, Moria, Psychic Meatloaf, Sanctuary, Spare Change News, the bleed, The Christian Science Monitor, and The Tower Journal.

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“Seasons in the Sun” by Terry Jacks

Since we’re pelted yet again with icy rain on the east coast, I think Terry Jack’s “Seasons in the Sun” is in order. As a boy, I loved this song and was completely innocent of its morbid content and downright tragic tone. The first below is a shortened version, but it shows Jacks playing along. The second is a fuller version, with a missing verse and key change restored. Finally, we have Nirvana’s cover version.

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Bethany’s Top Five Scenes by Which to Remember Philip Seymour Hoffman

We lost a great one. Here are a few clips to remember him by.

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“Mother Worries” by Shane Allison

Shane Allison’s poems and stories have appeared in juked, Mississippi Review, New Delta Review, Oyster Boy Review, Velvet Mafia, Suspect Thoughts, Plum Ruby Review, Saints and Sinners, and Wild and Willing.

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“After a Scientific Theory of Love” by Elizabeth Scanlon

Elizabeth Scanlon is an editor of The American Poetry Review. Her poems have appeared in many magazines, including Boston Review, Colorado Review, and Ploughshares, and in the anthologies Starting Today: Poems for Obama’s First 100 Days and Poets Against the War.

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Sarah Arvio and Ernest Hilbert at Penn Book Center

Join us for a tranquil winter Saturday afternoon of new poetry with Sarah Arvio, author of Night Thoughts (Knopf, 2013) and Ernest Hilbert, author of All of You on the Good Earth (Red Red Hen Press, 2013), sponsored by Random Name Poetry Series.

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“The Truth” by Dr. Dog

“As self-reinventions go, it doesn’t get much more extensive than Dr. Dog’s route on this year’s B-Room. For their seventh full-length, the band took to Clifton Heights to build up a new studio and living space in an abandoned silversmith mill. The result is a cleaner, tighter sound for a band now running on a decade-plus career with no signs of slowing their creative output. And that, of course, is much more important than any studio.” – Philadelphia Inquirer

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Two Poems by Sarah Arvio

Sarah Arvio’s latest book is Night Thoughts: 70 Dream Poems & Notes from an Analysis, a hybrid work made up of poetry, essay, and memoir, published by Alfred A. Knopf. Her earlier books of poems are Visits from the Seventh and Sono: Cantos, also published by Knopf. She has won the Rome Prize and received Bogliasco and Guggenheim fellowships. For many years a translator for the United Nations in New York and Switzerland, she has also taught poetry at Princeton. She now lives in Maryland, by the Chesapeake Bay.

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“Dear Lorine:” A.E. Clark

A.E. Clark received her B.A. from Beloit College and her M.F.A in Creative Writing from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her poems and book reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in New American Writing, Colorado Review, Court Green, Interim, and Witness. She currently lives in Las Vegas, where she works as an antiquarian bookseller.

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“Exterminator” by Lucien Stryk

A translator and influential practitioner of Zen poetics, Lucien Stryk was born in Kolo, Poland, in 1924. He moved to Chicago with his family in 1927 and studied at Indiana University; the University of Maryland, College Park; the Sorbonne; and the University of Iowa. A lifelong poet, he began writing in elementary school, even taking a copy of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass with him when he served in World War II. – Poetry Foundation

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“The God Fit” by Anne Carson, from “The Truth About God”

Anne Carson is a professor of Classics as well as a poet, essayist and translator. “In the small world of people who keep up with contemporary poetry,” wrote Daphne Merkin in the New York Times Book Review, “Anne Carson, a Canadian professor of classics, has been cutting a large swath, inciting both envy and admiration.”Carson has gained both critical accolades and a wide readership over the course of her “unclassifiable” publishing career. In addition to her many highly-regarded translations of classical writers such as Sappho and Euripides, and her triptych rendering of An Oresteia (2009), Carson has published poems, essays, libretti, prose criticism and verse novels that often cross genres. Known for her supreme erudition—Merkin called her “one of the great pasticheurs”—Carson’s poetry can also be heart-breaking and she regularly writes on love, desire, sexual longing and despair. Always an ambitious poet whatever her topic or genre, Merkin wrote of Carson’s The Beauty of the Husband, “I don’t think there has been a book since Robert Lowell’s Life Studies that has advanced the art of poetry quite as radically as Anne Carson is in the process of doing.” – Poetry Foundation

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